Process

Hand-Sewn Critters

For years I had access to excellent sources for old, used, discarded stuffed animals. Over the past few years, the good, funky ones are becoming harder and harder to find. About a year ago I got it into my skull that I should make my own. This was around the time my sewing machine decided to break down, which I then passed on to someone else who could give it more love than me. However, I had needles and thread and some supplies, and felt does well with hand sewing. Someday, I will make my own wool felt.

I have since created about a dozen of these, each different, and I have ideas for many more. They will eventually evolve and become their own art form (I love fiber, always have), but for now I am just playing. And since I have already proven to myself that I can paint stuffed animals like Ingres, if he were to paint such unloved toys, I am now exploring new ways to paint these creatures. Like the landscapes and other scenery, I am moving forward. To always paint the same, forever and ever, is stifling and not conducive to being a true artist.

Stuffed Creature by Alexandria LevinPainting by Alexandria Levin

Painting: Odd Blue Bird (above, right)
© Alexandria Levin, 2011, oil on panel, 8x10"

Painting by Alexandria LevinStuffed Creature by Alexandria Levin

Painting: Little Green Garlic (above, left)
© Alexandria Levin, 2011, oil on paper, 8.5x6.5"

Stuffed Creature by Alexandria LevinStuffed Creature by Alexandria LevinStuffed Creature by Alexandria Levin

Stuffed Creatures, from top: Blue Bird Thing, Three Leg Lizard Dog, Pink Kitty, Brown Rabbit Thing, Blue Cat Thing
© Alexandria Levin, 2011, felt, buttons, embroidery thread, pom poms, ribbon, polyester stuffing

graphic rule

Abstracted Landscapes and Photography

Every last one of my landscape, tree, azalea, cityscape and structure paintings is based on a photograph. I don't consider myself a photographer, as the images are just a means to another end. I take snapshots. Easily half of them have been taken from the windows of trains. The photographic image is simply for use as reference material from which to move forward. During this process the painting takes on a life of its own, and at some point I stop looking at the photo. The painting itself then tells me what it wants me to do. My job is to listen.

Photograph by Alexandria LevinPainting by Alexandria Levin

Painting: Autumnal Zoom
© Alexandria Levin, 2011, oil on paper, 6x9"

Photograph by Alexandria LevinPainting by Alexandria Levin

Painting: Miriam's Tree
© Alexandria Levin, 2011, oil on paper, 9x13"

Photograph by Alexandria LevinPainting by Alexandria Levin

Painting: Third Floor
© Alexandria Levin, 2011, oil on paper, 9x13"

Photograph by Alexandria LevinPainting by Alexandria Levin

Painting: Early Autumn Straw
© Alexandria Levin, 2011, oil on paper, 9.5x13.5"

graphic rule


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